Control Upgrade Parallelism In AutoUpgrade

Under the hood, AutoUpgrade uses the Parallel Upgrade Utility or catctl.pl to do the database upgrade. The Parallel Upgrade Utility has a long list of options that you can configure. The parallel options being the most notable. In your AutoUpgrade config file you can now specify a subset of options to catctl.pl using the parameter catctl_options.

Now, you should not expect a 10x improvement by adding a ton of CPUs to your upgrade. Mike Dietrich posted a really good article that explains what matters to an upgrade when it comes to performance. But f you want to squeeze out the very last resources on your system during upgrade, or want to fine-tune the distribution of CPUs the resource consumption, you can do it with AutoUpgrade.

How

First, you can find a list of catctl parameters in the documentation.

When you have determined the parameters that you want to use, specify them in your config file either globally (for all upgrades):

global.catctl_options=-N 8

or locally for a specific upgrade:

upg1.catctl_options=-N 8

The above examples will run the upgrade of PDBs using eight parallel processes.

You should have a look in the documentation to know the minimum and maximum values for the settings. At least for the parallel settings it is really good to know.

Non-CDB

Support for this parameter and non-CDB databases was added in 21.1.2. To ensure that the upgrade runs with as many parallel processes as possible:

upg1.catctl_options=-n 8

CDB and PDB

When you upgrade a CDB the following happen:

  • First, CDB$ROOT is upgraded using eight parallel processes.
  • Next, a number of PDBs are upgraded concurrently, starting with PDB$SEED. The total number of parallel processes to use is controlled by the parameter n.
  • Each individual PDB is upgraded using a number of SQL processes as well. This is controlled by the parameter N.

This means that the number of PDBs that are upgraded at the same time is: n / N

What is the best value of n?

  • If you are conservative you set n to CPU_COUNT.
  • If you are bold, you could probably raise it further, because some of the phases in the upgrade runs serially or doesn’t use the full parallel capacity. Try to set n to CPU_COUNT + 10 % and see how loaded your CPUs get. Keep increasing until you find a suitable level.

In the documentation there are some really good examples and explanations of using N and n together.

On a system with CPU_COUNT=48, put the following in your AutoUpgrade config file to run 6 PDB upgrades concurrently using 8 parallel processes:

upg1.catctl_options=-n 48 -N 8

Note, regardless of what you specify, when it comes to CDB$ROOT AutoUpgrade will always run with the maximum number of parallel processes. CDB$ROOT is special and it must be upgraded before any of the other ones can start. Hence, it makes sense to get it completed as fast as possible.

If you are doing an unplug-plug upgrade of a single PDB it could be a good idea to add more parallel processes to that single upgrade. If you want to use 8 parallel processes:

upg1.catctl_options=-N 8

Conclusion

It can be useful to override the default parallel settings during upgrades. You should not expect a 10x performance improvement, but you might squeeze out the very last resources. What is the best setting? It depends. You should go with the defaults, or test it using your own databases.

History

12 April 2021: Added information about support of non-CDB databases as of AutoUpgrade 21.1.2.

2 thoughts on “Control Upgrade Parallelism In AutoUpgrade

  1. Hi Daniel,

    does that required some particular recent autoupgrade version to work? I made good upgrades up to now with 19.9.2 and so kept this version unchanged. But it seems that

    upg1.catctl_options=-n 5

    did not apply in my config file as the upgrade still processes 8 PDBs in parallel.

    Thx. Robert

    Like

  2. Hi Robert,
    This feature is introduced in AutoUpgrade version 21. So you should head over to MOS and download the latest version, if you want to benefit from this enhancement.
    Regards,
    Daniel

    Like

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